C program to print alphabets from a to z

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Write a C program to print alphabets from a to z using for loop. How to print alphabets using loop in C programming. Logic to print alphabets from a to z in C program.

Example

Input


Output

Alphabets: 
a, b, c, ... , x, y, z

Required knowledge

Basic C programming, For loop

Logic to print alphabets from a to z

Printing alphabets in C, is little trick. If you are good at basics - data types and literals. Then you may find this as an easy exercise.

Let us first learn some basics about characters in C. Characters in C, internally are represented using ASCII codes. ASCII code is a fixed integer value for each global printable or non-printable characters. For example - ASCII value of a=97, b=98, A=65 etc. Hence, characters can be treated as integer. You can perform all basic arithmetic operations on character.

Let us now write the step by step descriptive logic to print alphabets.

  1. Declare a character variable, say ch.
  2. Initialize the loop counter with ch = 'a', that goes till ch <= 'z', with 1 increment. The loop structure should look like for(ch='a'; ch<='z'; ch++).
  3. Inside the loop body print the value of ch.

Program to print alphabets from a-z

/**
 * C program to print all alphabets from a to z
 */

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char ch;

    printf("Alphabets from a - z are: \n");
    for(ch='a'; ch<='z'; ch++)
    {
        printf("%c\n", ch);
    }

    return 0;
}

To prove that characters are internally represented as integer. Let us now print all alphabets using the ASCII values.

Program to display alphabets using ASCII values

/**
 * C program to display all alphabets from a-z using ASCII value
 */

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int i;

    printf("Alphabets from a - z are: \n");
    for(i=97; i<=122; i++)
    {
        /*
         * Integer i with %c will convert integer
         * to character before printing. %c will
         * take ascii from i and display its character
         * equivalent.
         */
        printf("%c\n", i);
    }

    return 0;
} 

If you want to print alphabets in uppercase using ASCII values. You can use ASCII value of A = 65 and Z = 90.

Learn how to print alphabets using other looping structures.

Output
Alphabets from a - z are:
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h
i
j
k
l
m
n
o
p
q
r
s
t
u
v
w
x
y
z

Happy coding ;)

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6 comments:

  1. Hey I did it like this Is this okay ?

    #include
    main()
    {
    char X='a';
    for(X='a';X<='z';X++)
    {
    printf("%c\n", X);
    }
    system("pause");
    }

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. @Gaurav yes... the code looks all OK to me. Just to say whether you have missed <stdio.h> after #include or the blogger has escaped it as HTML. If you have missed it you must add it.

      Delete
    2. The blogger must have escaped it I have kept it in the original code

      Delete
    3. Yes, the blogger has escaped the symbol. Well for this you may use &lt+; remove + sign for < and &gt+; without + sign for >

      Delete
  2. ABCBA
    AB BA
    A A
    AB BA
    ABCBA
    !!!!!.....?????

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. #include <stdio.h>

      int main()
      {
      int i, j, n;

      n = 3; //Max number of rows

      for(i=n; i>=1; i--)
      {
      for(j=1; j<=i; j++)
      {
      printf("%c", 64+j);
      }
      if(i==n)
      j=j-1;
      else //Prints space if row > 1
      printf(" ");

      for(j=j-1;j>=1; j--)
      {
      printf("%c", 64+j);
      }
      printf("\n");
      }

      for(i=1; i<=n; i++)
      {
      for(j=1; j<=i; j++)
      {
      printf("%c", 64+j);
      }
      if(i==n)
      j=j-1;
      else
      printf(" ");

      for(j=j-1;j>=1; j--)
      {
      printf("%c", 64+j);
      }
      printf("\n");
      }

      return 0;
      }

      Delete